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Late-game slump does in Badgers basketball against MSU

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. Unfortunately for the Wisconsin Badgers, the worst of times came down the stretch in a 67-59 loss to No.11 Michigan State at the Kohl Center.

The Badgers led by as many as 7 points in the first half, but went over 5 minutes without scoring single point to end the second half and the Spartans were able to take full advantage.

Wisconsin trailed 57-56 with 5:20 to play after a made free throw from Brad Davison.

MSU went on an 8-0 run during that time and opened up a commanding 9-point lead with 15 seconds to play. Davison stopped the bleeding a bit with a three-pointer to make the score 65-59, but with 10 seconds to go the game was well over already.

Ethan Happ went over the 2,000-point mark in the loss, scoring a team-best 20 points on 10-20 shooting from the field. He also added 12 rebounds for another double double on the year and his career record 48th.

Michigan State was led by guard Cassius Winston with 23 points, while Kenny Goins and Nick Ward added 12 points a piece for the victors.

Turning Point: That Second-half slump

It’s funny how things can change in the game of basketball. I could’ve easily been writing about McQuaid’s flagrant foul and the ensuing 9-2 run that gave Wisconsin a 7-point lead in the first half.

Michigan State played catchup for a big amount of time from that point forward.

But, none of that turned the game to the result that actually happened. Instead, it was the most frustrating thing to watch — a team with plenty of chances just squandering them left and right.

That’s what happened over the course of the final 5:20 of the game. It was a combination of going ice cold from the field and playing some truly bad defense that saw this game flip on its head.

Stats That Mattered Most:

40-28: Michigan State outrebounded Wisconsin 40-28 on Tuesday night. You can’t win games when you go cold from the field and can’t grab a rebound on the other end either. When you are shooting 1 percent different than your opponent this type of stat really matters.

14-7: That rebounding advantage was also 10-6 on offensive rebounds and MSU got a 7-point advantage in second chance points on the game. Again, in an 8-point loss this is a big deal.

2-10: Wisconsin was 2 of 10 from beyond the arc in the second half of this game after shooting 4 of 10 in the first half. Simply put, the Badgers couldn’t find quality shots from beyond the arc and they also put up some really bad looks from deep thanks to MSU’s suffocating defense.

Bottom Line:

This was a must-have game for the Badgers if they wanted a real chance to compete for a Big Ten regular season title. So, kiss that opportunity good bye.

Wisconsin going through major shooting slumps is nothing new, but this was the worst example of what happens when that is combined with horrible transition defense.

This loss also sets up an interesting question for this team heading down the final stretch of the regular season. Will this in-game slump situation fix itself or will it sink this team’s postseason hopes?

If the final 5 minutes of this game were any indication, the Badgers are in some deep trouble come the Big Ten and NCAA tournaments.

Up Next:

Wisconsin will take on Illinois at home on Monday, Feb. 18 at 7pm CT on FS1.

Andy Coppens is the Founder and Publisher of Talking10. He's a member of the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and has been covering college sports in some capacity since 2008. You can follow him on Twitter @AndyOnFootball

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Badgers Basketball

5 things to know about Badgers vs. Oregon in NCAA tournament

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When the Wisconsin Badgers saw their name back up in the NCAA tournament bracket after a one-year absence there was much joy.

However, for the fan base there was also much groaning thanks to yet another matchup with the Oregon Ducks in the NCAA tournament. It’s also a team that most fans will know as a dangerous one, even if they are a No. 12 seed.

Oregon is arguably the hottest team in tournament, riding an eight-game win streak. They’ve outscored opponents 72.0 to 54.2 points per game and holding opponents to 34.6 percent shooting from the field and 23.1 percent from beyond the arc.

All of that tells us just how serious the Badgers have to take this matchup with the Pac-12 champions.

So, ahead of Friday’s matchup with the Ducks at 3:30pm CT, let’s look at the 5 things we need to know about this matchup.

5: Wisconsin has allowed just 5 teams to score 70-plus points in a game this season

There’s a reason why the Badgers are ranked 3rd in the country in Adjusted Defense by KenPom.com and thats’ because they don’t let teams score points in droves.

To that point, the Badgers have allowed opponents to score 70 or more points against them in just 5 of 33 games played so far this season.

Furthermore, just two teams this season have scored 80 points or more, with losses in both of those games (84-80 OT to Purdue & 83-76 to Western Kentucky). So, keeping the Ducks offense from getting going is going to be vital.

4: Wisconsin has reached the Sweet 16 in 4 of last 5 seasons

Birth, death, taxes…and the Wisconsin Badgers making the Sweet 16? It’s been almost automatic as of late for UW, who have made it to the second weekend of the tournament in 4 of the last 5 seasons.

The Badgers have also done it in 6 of the last 8 years.

Impressive, right? But did you know that no other team in the country has matched or topped that number? It’s true…it’s damn true.

Additionally, Oregon’s resurgence has come largely thanks to a switch to a “big” lineup with 4 players 6-9 or taller in the starting lineup.

3: Both teams have 3 starters averaging double figures

Both Wisconsin and Oregon will feature three starters each that are averaging double figures this season. Leading all six of those players is Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ (17.5). He’s joined by Brad Davison and D’Mitrick Trice — both of whom are averaging 10.7 points per game.

Oregon is led by freshman guard Louis King (13.1) and is joined by fellow guard Payton Pritchard (12.7) and forward Paul White (10.6).

What this game could come down to is how the rest of the group shows up. UW has been able to count on another big man in Nate Reuvers plenty throughout the season and Khalil Iverson has been a huge presence as of late. Will that continue after nearly a week off?

2: Pritchard scored 20 or more points twice in the Pac-12 tournament

If you need a reason for why the Oregon Ducks are even in the tournament, look no further than the hot hand of Payton Pritchard. In three games in the Pac-12 tournament, Pritchard put up 20 points twice and in the third game he hit for 18 points.

That’s an average of 19.3 points per game and a scary matchup for the Badgers efficient defense to have to deal with.

On the flip side of that hot hand, it does seem as if 20 points is his ceiling on the scoring front. Pritchard has managed to score more than 20 points just once this season, and that happened in the season opener against Portland State in which he put up 22 points in a large win.

1: Ethan Happ is the No. 1 player in the KenPom.com player ratings

In an age of stretch forwards and 7-footers with jump shots galore, Happ is a throwback player who rarely shoots from outside of three feet. But, that hasn’t stopped him from being one of the most dominant players in the country. So much so that Ken Pomeroy has him ranked as the No. 1 player in the country.

Not only is Happ averaging 17.5 points, but he is also averaging 10.1 rebounds and 4.6 assists per game. Should he finish the season averaging 16 points, 10 rebounds and 4 assists per game, he would be just the second player in 20 years to accomplish that.

Oh, and Happ is 1 of 6 players in NCAA history to record 2,000 points, 1,000 boards and 400 assists, joining Oscar Robertson, Larry Bird, Danny Ferry, Stacey Augmon and John Konchar.

Enjoy his final games in a Badgers uniform.

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Badgers Basketball

Badgers get Oregon again in NCAA tournament

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After bowing out in the Big Ten tournament semi-final on Saturday afternoon, everyone was waiting to find out where the Wisconsin Badgers would be heading in the NCAA tournament.

It didn’t take long to get that answer, as the Badgers were given a No. 5 seed in the South region, which was the second region to be revealed in the selection show.

Their opponent? Oregon. AGAIN.

The destination? Go West young man.

Wisconsin will meet the Ducks in San Jose, Calif. on Friday and the winner will get the winner of Kansas State vs. UC-Irvine in the next round on Sunday.

This will be the third matchup between the two teams in the last five years of the NCAA tournament.

Wisconsin has won both previous matchups between these two teams, topping the Ducks 85-77 in a second round matchup. UW would do it all over again the next year, besting the Ducks 72-65 in another second round matchup.

Wisconsin is in the top half of the South region bracket and that could set up another very familiar matchup, as the Virginia Cavaliers are the No. 1 seed in the region.

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5 Things to know about Badgers vs. Nebraska in Big Ten tournament

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The season of redemption has reached the postseason and unlike last year, the Wisconsin Badgers of this season are firmly in the NCAA tournament. There’s no need to win the Big Ten title to get to the dance.

Of course, that doesn’t mean the Badgers won’t want to showcase themselves by winning the whole tournament either.

Wisconsin will step on to the United Center court for the first time in the Big Ten tournament on Friday afternoon. Across from them will be a red-hot Nebraska Cornhuskers team, who have won twice — including an upset of No. 5 seed Maryland — to get here.

So, what do we need to know about this matchup and the Badgers in the Big Ten tourney in general? Let’s get it going.

5: Nebraska and the 55-point mark are vital to this game

Wisconsin is one of the best defensive teams in the country this year, ranking 4th in defensive efficiency according to KenPom.com. That doesn’t bode well for the Nebraska Cornhuskers though, because they’ve only managed to top 55 points in 7 of the 13 previous matchups since joining the Big Ten.

All four of the Badgers losses to Nebraska since they joined the league have come with Nebraska scoring more than 55 points (58 being their lowest in a win over UW). The Huskers are averaging a meager 57.9 points per game against UW overall since joining the B1G.

The Badgers have also held Nebraska to 55 points or less in four of the nine wins in the series since becoming league foes.

4: The Badgers are the No. 4 seed in the Big Ten tournament

Let’s just say this program is coming back home when it comes to postseason play, shall we? After all, the Badgers have been amongst the top 4 seeds in the conference tournament in 16 of the last 18 years.

By earning those seeds, one would think the Badgers have a history of success in the tournament or something? Is that true? Let’s find out together.

3: Wisconsin has won 3 Big Ten tournament titles.

That may not seem like a lot, but for those of us who are in our 30’s and can still remember the days without a Big Ten postseason tournament that number is a lot. UW won tournament titles in 2004, 2008 and 2015. So, math tells us they are likely due for another banner to be risen in to the rafters at the Kohl Center.

Wisconsin has not been a slouch in the tournament overall either, having played seven more times in the title game and owning a .571 record in the history of the tourney.

2: Happ’s continued run at history

We all know that Ethan Happ is historically good. But, did you know that Happ is on pace to be just the 2nd player in the last 20 years in all of D1 basketball to average 16 ppg, 10 rpg & 4 apg.

Right now, Happ is averaging 17.8 points, 10.4 rebounds and 4.7 assists per game — so he’s well on his way to achieving that mark.

As for the matchup with Nebraska, Happ is averaging 14.2 ppg, 9.2 rpg and 2.6 apg in five games against them. If he’s going to stay on track for his record-breaking season and career, he’ll likely have to duplicate if not exceed most of those numbers.

1: The Badgers own the Big Ten’s best March winning percentage in last 6 seasons

Winning titles only happens by winning games and the Badgers have a very long history of doing that in March. So much so that its 29-9 (7.63) mark is the best amongst all Big Ten teams during games played in the month of March.

When you say Wisconsin in March, you said it all.

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Badgers Basketball

Matthews powers Michigan past Badgers

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No. 19 Wisconsin came in red-hot, while the No. 7 Michigan Wolverines were limping through the middle of the Big Ten slate. All of that stopped as Charles Matthews poured in 18 points and led his Wolverines to a 62-51 victory over the Badgers.

It was a big of revenge served ice cold late in the contest, as UW made just one basket in the final 4:16 of the game and it allowed the Wolverines to slowly take control of the game.

Michigan used an 8-0 run over the final 90 seconds of the game to give them full control of the game.

Matthews wasn’t the only threat that helped the Wolverines in the win. Jon Teske had 17 points and 12 rebounds going up against Ethan Happ. Michigan also got 10 points from Jordan Poole in the winning effort.

Happ led the Badgers with 18 points and 11 rebounds, but he had just 4 points in the second half as Teske really shut him off from being able to dominate down low.

No other Badger reached double figures in the loss.

Turning Point: The Final 4:16

There’s nothing more frustrating than watching victory slip right through your fingers and you can’t seem to hit the broad side of the barn in the process.

Happ’s layup with 4:16 left in the game pulled the Badgers within one point at 51-50 and the back-and-forth nature of the game seemed to continue. But, the Badgers failed to score again until Brad Davison got a layup to make the game 59-52 with just 7 seconds left to play.

By then, Michigan had blown the game wide open and UW’s hopes for a season sweep of the Wolverines had gone by the wayside.

During that scoreless stretch, the Badgers were 0-5 from the field, turned the ball over once and just never got the offense flowing.

Credit a lot of the trouble to Michigan’s defense though, because they smothered UW most of the day.

Stats That Mattered Most:

5: Wisconsin managed just five assists for the entire game compared to 11 for Michigan. That indicates a lot of one-on-one basketball and that is not how the Badgers win basketball games.

19: Michigan and Wisconsin tied on the day with 30 rebounds a piece, but the hosts outrebounded the Badgers 19-14 in the second half. Wisconsin only had 2 second chance points in the half and just 3 offensive rebounds. You can’t get cold and not get rebounds and expect to win.

2: That is the number of free throw attempts for the Badgers in the entire game. Considering they played through Happ a lot early on, this number is surprising and not helpful towards winning ball games either. On the flip side, Michigan had just 9 free throw attempts, but went 7-9 on those limited attempts.

Bottom Line:

We all knew that the big run by the Badgers was going to eventually end. How this game ended was a gut-punch though, as UW showed it could go toe-to-toe with Michigan on the road only to go ice cold from the field.

It’s hard not to feel like this was an opportunity lost. UW came in just one game out of the top of the Big Ten, but this loss and an impending date with Michigan State could mean a quick end to the hopes for a regular season title.

Going forward, the Badgers have to put the bad ending behind them and show it was a blip instead of a pattern.

Wisconsin will host Michigan State on Tuesday at 6pm on ESPN2.

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